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Making the Best of Savagery                      CONTACT AUTHOR

NEW  Surname Summit in Scotland -> News


We see Ann Wildblood née Vernon (1814 or 1815-1892) with daughter Betsy Vernon Wildblood (1856-1929). Betsy married Herbert Wetton in 1874 in Fenton. This Wetton family is seen on the Photos page of this site. Two of her brothers emigrated to Canada and started the “Vernon Wildblood” tradition in Ontario and California.

The picture was handed down to Jean Goldstraw, whom we thank for permission to use it on the family website. Jean, a great-granddaughter of Betsy, was born in Penkridge, a place dear to all Wildblood historians, where Thomas Wildblood was christened in 1727. Virtually all Staffordshire-rooted Wildbloods living today trace their ancestry to him and not much farther back.

Taking down our 2013 holiday decorations, we display a year-round holiday opportunity in Scotland, owned and operated by Lorraine and Patrick Wildblood. They warmly welcome all members of the worldwide clan to the latest Wildblood-run home away from home. The feeder in the foreground is a preferred stop for a pair of collared doves. Read more about it under News or visit the Glenernan Cottage website.

In this 2013 season to be jolly we present our Wenonah as she appears in a short film entitled “Joyful Nights.” This Miss Wildblood is an actress and singer based in Berlin and an offspring of the website author. We try to have a different holiday picture each December on this home page and request images from all celebrating Wildbloods and Whilebloods. Pictures of yore and/or of Yorkshire. We have a vintage Father Christmas from Staffordshire lined up for December 2014. If you would like to see Wenonah taking two minutes and four seconds to unwrap a present, just go to this star shooting. It is in English and very nice, but it has an utterance that was naughty in Christmases past. Don't say I didn't warn you.

Australian-born Poppy Wildblood, five in July 2012, and brother Joey Wildblood, who entered the world in England and is three in January 2013, currently live in Stanley, Hong Kong. Their mother Elisha gave birth to a third child, Freddie James Wildblood, in Hong Kong in March 2013. Yorkshire-born father Andrew is head of Telstra's Asian operations.

The massive continent has seen quite a few Wildbloods in recent months and years. Mark is in Vietnam, Mike in Indonesia, William John ran a guest house in South India, his brother promoted cricket there and in Pakistan, and others have visited Cambodia, China and Mongolia for business and pleasure in the recent past.



Maria and Alan Wildblood in Berlin
wish all readers merry holidays and a good start in the coming year.

This wintry scene is from the Christmas market in Meiningen, Thuringia.


second wife, née Lillian Bergetta Scott (1892-1958), located in Northwood, Ontario. John, standing on the front lawn, was the son of an immigrant from Staffordshire. Lil, in the shade at the left rear corner of the house, was from Prince Edward Island. The aerial view passed down from John's son Clifford to genealogist granddaughter Sharlie Stubbs.


One clansman who offered feedback to the 2010 family newsletter was David Wildblood in North Wales. When approached in a follow-up, Dave kindly permitted us to show his drawing of golden retriever Fflur, who is a client at Dave's business, Berties Petcare Services in Rhes-y-cae, Holywell, Clwyd. David and his wife, the former Susan Cartlidge, relocated to the rural community in the Halkyn Mountain area from Alsager, Cheshire. The couple used to play in a folk music band. The pet portrayer is seen below when he worked for Celestica, an electronics contract manufacturer in Kidsgrove, Stoke-on-Trent.

Dave joins several Wildblood artists known to the website author. Like the dog depictor, the late Denzil Wildblood of Wales and Western Australia, focused on pets, in his case, his budgies. Dave calls the work of Darryl David (DD) Wildblood, who is seen “a few doors” below, “striking and original.” Currently painting is Rita Wildblood in York. Another Yorkshire painter was Hubert Jack Wildblood 1904-1982, whose “Kirkstall Abbey” was recently offered at auction.


Andy in Ontario promptly furnished a chilling study of bluejay to update his seasonal series of ornithological perspectives. Even if this winter is severe out your way, we hope you will be better sheltered next to a fire or under down than this lightly feathered model. P.S. Andy didn't freeze. He captured the prey through the window of a friend.


To mark spring 2010’s debut and acknowledge our indebtedness to Canada for making a cold winter bearable with a successful Olympics, we present a harbinger on a maple leaf. The photo was made by Rochdale nestling Andrew B. Wildblood, who has perched in Hamilton, Ontario, for most of the past two decades. Andy has worked as a mechanical fitter. His employer, AVL Manufacturing, assigned him to Alberta oilfields for a while. The single Canadian is the son of the late Jeffrey George Wildblood, and Audrey, who remains in Rochdale.  
Andy spends some of his spare time capturing feathered fellows on film. Several Wildbloods are great nature photographers. On the Internet you can find wonderful shots by Gill Wildblood in the Orkneys, Chris Wildblood, a full professional, in Namibia, and migratory Margie Wildblood, to cite three of the most prominent.  
Wildbloods from Britain and Ireland have gone to Canada to live for well over a century. If it weren’t for the call of America's far north, there would be no Nevada or California kin. Mention is made on this site of colonies in British Columbia and Ontario, as well as folk in Manitoba and a death in Montreal. First Nations’ Bill Peacock used “Elmer Wildblood” as his pen name.  Andy is now one of two “listed” Canadian Wildbloods, but the name has blazed a trail from the Maritimes to the offshore Pacific. Lillian Scott Wildblood was buried on Prince Edward Island. Author Peter Wildeblood died on Vancouver Island.


Four generations are pleased for you to meet them. It is an all-smile affair except for the baby, who seems to beWILDered by the global attention. The oldest and youngest are seated, in case you can't tell. From left Kay née Parker and her husband of 62 years, Edward David Wildblood, who is from a Shropshire family. Kay was bred in Yorkshire, while Edward is the brother of the recently deceased Alan James Wildblood (see "News").  Their son David is at the top right. His wife of almost 40 years, although she doesn’t look it, is the beaming blonde, Angela, whom we thank for submitting the recent photo. The sons of Angela and David are Darryl, top left, and Andrew, the other young man. Andrew's wife is the redhead, Lorna. The son of Andrew and Lorna is Charlie, the fourth little man in the top row. The youngest of the family is Elizabeth, born in June 2009. The most senior generation lives in the Bristol area, but the others are based in Yorkshire. David is a landscaper, Darryl a high-profile and very creative artist, Andrew a gamekeeper, and Elizabeth, for the time being, a doll.

Father Christmas or Santa Claus? One thing is for sure: this distinguished character has numerous close and distant relatives named Wildblood. His far-flung gift to his worldwide kin for our December 2009 celebration is permission to deck our family website with his twinkling presence. The jolly old gentlemen is going to find out who's naughty and nice and reward us accordingly. Will it be diamonds, stuffed stockings, candy canes and sugar plums, or Midlands coal and brett and water? We three kiddies in the land of the Weihnachtsmann join him in wishing readers in all four hemispheres the merriest of seasons. Since it is blessed to give and receive, we put at the top of our wish list for 2010 your submission of more Christmas photos of Wildbloods and Whilebloods for similar decorations in the coming years.


Seasons come and seasons go and here we see Ronald James Wildblood, Jr. and his son Jacob Wildblood at 2009 spring training in Clearwater, Florida. Although Ron has lived up and down the eastern seaboard, now stepping up to the plate in Georgia, his New Jersey and Delaware roots incline him toward the Philadelphia Phillies. Jake plays baseball for the Red Sox, not quite in the Major Leagues yet, and his maternal grandfather lives in Massachusetts, so the eight-year-old lad is rooting for the Boston team, which won that day. The frustrated Phillies fan is from one of the two Trenton Wildblood families.

Time to Take Down the Tree and Get Out the Rice. At Valentine's 2009 we relive a 1928 Liverpool love story. The bride is Elsie Wildblood, the groom Robert Curig Lobley. The maids awaiting are (left) sister Agnes Wildblood, who wed Arthur Jones a decade later. On the right sister Martha, who must have caught the bouquet, because she marched to the altar just four years later.The pictures were gratefully received from Elsie's daughter, Vera Hickey, and her daughter, Paula Taylor. For more on Martha, go to Photos.

CHRISTMAS
OF YORE
IN HORNSEA
ABOUT
55 YEARS AGO
From left
Ben 1946-2002
Sarah
Tim 1941-1965
Jen
The Cliff Road kids
are the darlings
of John Roland
and Kathleen.
These Wildbloods
moved to Leeds
after a few years,
then to Haxby.
The surviving sisters
now deck the halls
north of York
after greeting
Petit Papa
for a few Noels
under an arbre
in Lot-et-Garonne
far away from
this Christmas past.

    BRISTOL STOMP VINTAGE 1934 PERFORMED BY GORDON AND JAMIE

These good eggs entertaining parents and peers back at Easter 1934 are Gordon (left) and Jamie Wildblood, sons of James Henry Wildblood (1876-1957) and his second wife, Rosina Howell. The dancer's father moved from northern Shropshire in World War II to work in Bristol shipyards. He had a total of eight children, and Rosina helped raise Jamie's late daughter Valerie (1943-1965), the victim of an automobile accident. Gordon and Jamie danced for a decade in a wide variety of costumes. The two boys shown here, now octogenarians, remain the best of friends after decades of work, military service at Osnabrück in Germany and Mestre outside Venice, Italy, and through a lot of thin along with the thick. Your can read more on Jamie today on the News page of this website.  Below the performing pair hs donned a more grown-up get-up.  

The reason the lads appear to be a bit bottom heavy is that this image was captured by a digital camera at an angle designed to avoid a flash reflection.

          Where There's Smoke, There's California-Fried Chicken

Ventura County fire crew at home of Virginia and Steve Wildblood in June 2008. That's Virginia in pink. She is average height so the firemen must be knee high to the redwoods. The blazetrailers took a few minutes out for some refreshment and play with the Wildblood retrievers during their bout with the Concow Fires. Virginia said of the crews: "We have friends, God love them."

Growing Into a Name in Munich.  Bavaria's Capital Is Her Stage.

As February 2008 began, Wenonah Wildblood was completing her first semester at the Bavarian Musical Theater Academy. She was accepted to the elite school following an audition in March 2007 on her first try, the youngest and gungest in her class. Wenonah finished secondary school in her native Berlin and has Polish and 60-miles-off- Broadway roots. Her curriculum includes ballet, jazz dance, acting and singing. The talented performer previously had major roles in "Fame" and "Jekyll and Hyde" at her high school and took the scrumptious part of Audrey in "Little Shop of Horrors" at Kap Arkona underneath a Baltic lighthouse in 2007 summer stock. First-year students are not permitted to audition for remunerative extracurricular performances, but she will be showcased with her class of 12 in a student-written musical in April 2008. Wenonah has known what to become when she grows up since she saw "West Side Story" in Berlin before she entered kindergarten. The 20-year-old student believes her front-and-center surname helped her stand out in the crowd of admissions candidates. One of her instructors says the blonde belter needs to keep honing her skills to put on a show that can match her name to fame. The extra-special ex-Berliner is not the first Wildblood to study in the Löwenbräu's lair. Richard Garside Wildblood from Yorkshire was enrolled at Munich University in 1937-38. His knowledge of reichtime German was an asset in the Allied war effort.     

1922 Jam Session Rings in 2008. Goateed Joseph Wildblood 1840-1926, one of many Burslem-born members of our breed, with son, Charles Stanton Wildblood, partner in Canning & Wildblood, fruit preservers, pose with a bucket for an unpreserved reason. Let’s imagine the vessel was for the jam the family business produced for decades, starting in Balsall Heath, Kings Norton, Worcestershire, which is all West Midlands today. Twenty-first century rocket-wielding January 1 revelers may find it hard to believe, but their elders rang in the new by banging spoons and ladles on pots and pans. The May 1922 garden photo session was at Sevenoaks, the family mansion in the Midlands map-jam. Old telephone directories suggest the address may have been 42 Handsworth Wood Road. By 1922 Joseph, who started as a haberdasher and commercial traveler, had been predeceased by wife Annie, née

Stanton, probably the only Wildblood ever born in (British) Honduras. Charles the jam maker married Martha Dalton of Tamworth at Egbaston in 1895. The first fruit of their union was Marjorie Stanton Wildblood (seen on the left at an "in-law" residence in Penarth, Glamgoran, in about 1911); the second child, short-lived Hilda Dalton Wildblood; and another was nurse Norah Howard Wildblood. Norah, born in 1899, never married, but the lovely lady in uniform depicted below is sadly no longer available. You know where the Stanton and Dalton middle names were from already. To explain the Howard, we have to climb the maternal tree a bit higher. Martha Dalton’s grandmother was Martha Howard. Perhaps it was to avoid confusion that Mrs. Charles Wildblood was known as Pattie, to the extent that the diminutive was mentioned in her marriage announcement. “Howard” as a first and middle name continued for several generations in the Dalton and Taylor families. Yes. Taylor. We are indebted to Jonathan Taylor in Lincoln for scanning and sharing these images. His grandfather, Howard Dalton Taylor (1897-1989) was a traveling salesman for Canning & Wildblood.

We met Jonathan through Ancestry.com in December 2007. Jonathan is Norah’s first cousin, twice removed. From Penarth to Lincoln, these families got around. Charles Stanton Wildblood was involved in a fruit growing enterprise in Scotland until 1930. The Times curiously called the location “Perth, North Britain.” In 1913, date of the earliest know press coverage of the Birmingham breakfast partnership, C. S. testified in a dilution trial at Marlebone on the virtues of adding apple juice to raspberry jam. Charles had the means to treat himself to a Canaries cruise in the hard times of 1946. However, Canning & Wildblood, which also dealt in textiles, became unprofitable about 1970 and was devoured by a tamer label.

The 30 A3-sheet trees in the diagram below cover most of the UK Wildbood families of the 19th and 20th centuries. The trees were painstakingly compiled and drawn by Harry Charie over a 20-year period and are slowly being computerized by his designated successor. A bigger and better copy of this outline will be emailed to anyone requesting it. The names Harry gave to the pages are POTTERS, WILD(E)BLOOD, EDMUND, MINERS, HUMBERSIDE, LEEDS, TRIPLETS, STONE, RAILWAY, SHEFFIELD, WEST DERBY LANCS, DURHAM, BOATMEN, CHESHIRE, BARNSLEY, WEST MIDLANDS, WORKHOUSE, SHROPSHIRE, NEWPORT & MANCHESTER, SHREWSBURY, WALES, BRISTOL, ROCHDALE. TRIPLETS could also be called RHEAD, and those unnamed my their author might be dubbed MALKIN, HARRISON, BOWERS, PLANT, ARCHER, FRYER, referring to the maiden name of the marriage at the top of the chart.



       Slightly Abridged Excerpts From Diary of Blitz Baby Freda Wildblood

1951. (Niece) Wendy (Hirst) was 12 months now, it seemed very funny having a baby in the house, because up until now I’d been the only child.

(Sister) Joyce and (brother-in-law) Alf bought a great big Silver Cross pram for Wendy. I couldn’t see over the top of it. The pram was a beautiful thing, but it was the last thing in the kitchen at night and the first thing out of the kitchen in the morning, because you couldn’t move for it.


At Easter time that year I was having problems with my eyesight. My mother Mary Josephine took me to the opticians on Sheffield Road to see a Mrs. Mildred Atkinson. After testing my eyes she said that I would need glasses all the time, because I was shortsighted. This didn’t go down very well because I was always fighting and I was backwards and forwards every week for the glasses straightening or because they were broken. I kept throwing them in a drawer or losing them outside, anything so I wouldn’t have to wear them. (To the left Freda poses with her spectacles in her hands before their welcome wore out. You can make them out if your eyes are better than hers.)

1951 seemed to go fast and in July all I could think of was the six weeks holidays to look forward to. All the street kids went on long walks for the day, even the toddlers and dogs, or we would stay in the street and play games. What long and idle days they were.

The best walks we went were to Lock Park on Park Road, Barnsley. We followed the path round and it brought you to the playing area. There were see-saws, sand pit, slide and a swagger. Oh, that swagger!!! Only the bravado would go on that when the older kids got on it. I once did get on, but I soon fell off. Never again!

The October break we called potato picking week and this was my first time to go. Off the street mob went, with their zinc buckets, bottles of water and some bread and jam. I don’t know what time we set off. I only know that it was dark.

ALL GROWN UP! Freda Stenton, spectacular in spectacles, reigns over a Chinese takeaway party at the home of niece Wendy Dodson in Wakefield on August 30, 2008. Freda granted an audience to Alan Lee and Maria Wildblood of Berlin. Genealogist Alan Dodson, who married "the baby in the house," arranged the meeting, but took a back seat, along with Freda's husband, Tony Stenton. 


                                  A Stiff Collar in a Softspoken Pose

It
was
summer
1916


when
this
all-Wildblood
family
posed


at
the manse
in
Grimsby,


then
in
Lincolnshire.

Bottom from left Rev. Charles Bowers Wildblood, his mum, Marion née Bowers, and his brother, William Arthur, killed a year later near Ypres by long-range German artillery. Standing the preacher's wife, Margaret née Morgan, and his dad, Charles. The clergyman's grandson, Stephen Charles, found the picture in three pieces, put it back together and submitted it to this site.

January 2007. DNA Study organized by Susan C. Metates in the United States needs the contribution of a Wildblood male with Astbury, Cheshire, roots. If your lineage fits and is bonafide legitimate for numerous generations, contact John of Alsager, found on the Background page, to volunteer and arrange for a simple procedure to obtain three samples from your oral cavity.

           NOW WE ARE RUSHING EASTER with the spring of a maiden's youth.

After a photograph from Dixie, one from the North and one the South Island of New Zealand, we finally featured an English scene as the leading illustration in the early 2007 fourth edition of the worldwide Wildblood site. One hated to take down Margie's wreath, below, but the young girl on the left is equally decorative. She is Norma Wildblood, featured as an adult on our News page. Norma is unable to recall the doll's name, but she has not forgotten it was a present from her great aunt and godmother, Alice Lindop. Admiring her Shirley Temple look, we can understand why Norma distanced herself from her maiden name. The picture was taken in her garden in Newcastle-under-Lyme. The bloom's proud father is Norman William Wildblood. He was a carpenter and was employed in the construction of new houses, offices and roads. The photo was taken in the early 1950s. To see what this little walking, talking, living doll is up to know, go to News, where you can also catch a glimpse of her slightly younger dad in uniform.

Our 2006 season's greeting is the artwork of Margie Wildblood in Kokomo, Indiana. This is her Boilermaker Wreath. Margie and husband, another crafty character, New Jersey native Dr. Bob, studied psychology at Purdue. They are now associated with the University of Indiana, and Margie's Hoosier Wreath will adorn the 2006 Wildblood newsletter. Margie was initially Bob's student at Radford University in Virginia. If anyone else has decked with holly, a Christmas photograph for 2007 would be appreciated.

Nine lives, no cats, but a baseball-team-size roster of Wildbloods, and two Crawfords to boot, believe it or not. In this beginning-to-look-a-lot-like-last-Christmas shot, we count, clockwise from top left, Bruce, Lynn, Chris, Hanna, Diane, Jessie, Megan, Nancy and Jim. Megan says she never saw that many Wildbloods before. Who can submit a larger, football-size squad and claim top billing on this page of the international family album?

This site dedicated to linking and publicizinThis site is dedicated to linking and publicizing Wildbloods worldwide. Any Wildblood who wants to claim fame or notoriety via this medium is welcome to send me his or her photo to my address at the top of this page. You can splatter me with your private or business links, your news and boos, praise, yeahs and nays. Boasting an E in conduct and an A in yellow journalism, the compiler is trying to make this publication fittingly ferocious as well as informative and begs you to yell, howl or bark if the literary animal steps on any paws or pounces on tender toes.

GENES REUNITED ATTRACTS 70 PLUS WILDBLOOD FREAKS !

The wildblood.org host joined Genes Reunited on August 13, 2006, and was surprised that at least 70 other persons had already posted one Wildblood or more. “At least” because it is likely that more than one person has logged on as Andrew, David, John, Peter and Susan. Almost all entries concern Wildbloods born in England. No Scottish or Welsh arrivals or registrars are included, but I am sure the whole British kilt and caboodle will get united soon. One birth in Libya was reported. Two Australians and possibly one Kiwi have joined the insular crowd. The only American sighted to date is yours sincerely, and he recorded one birth in Germany. The youngest newcomer mentioned was in the 2000 crop, spelled Wildeblood by Michelle, who should know, although the baby’s father had signed his unique artistic creations in more orthodox fashion. The earliest incarnations of souls with the sanguine surname were 1700 listed by Jean; 1711 by Paul; 1791 by Sharron, Simon, Lorna and Andrew; 1796 by Nick; and 1798 by Deborah. Prehistoric if our era of secular record begins in 1837.

The identities of the majority of the posters are known to the writer and several are old collaborators, but some are as mysterious as the origin of the species, probably only enabling a few Wildbloods to come down from an extensively researched tree. Several people only entered their own year of birth, others a few relatives, and several ranged so far that their scope reveals they consider Genes United as one of their key repositories of genealogical treasures. Full Genes membership costs something like £10 so the marginally curious will not be able to contact other free subscribers through the site. Since 2006 your host has been paying the going rate, monitoring new additions once a week and getting in in touch with numerous posters.

The number of persons using the above-linked Internet trading post is very encouraging to those of us who have been trying to establish connections between Wildbloods around the world and between contemporaries and long-buried namesakes. One is tempted to conclude that current UK interest  warrants another attempt to plan a homecoming of the diaspora. Is there anyone in Barnsley, for instance, who might like to help host and organize a conclave of the clan? Evidence in the records entered at Genes Reunited goes far toward establishing the Yorkshire town as the Wildblood Capital of the World at this point in time. A preliminary tally indicates that Alan, not me and quite likely not a Wildblood, has published the largest number of nameholders, and they concentrate heavily on Barnsley. The two other biggest Genes contributors of Wildbloods are: for Staffordshire, Simon who has seemingly left no Stone unturned; and for Shropshire, Andrew, who long dwells on Wellington but warms his heart on a much wider radiation of heritage hearths. (P.S. The Prolific Alan turned out to be Alan Dodson and terrific Andrew to be surnamed Tomlinson. Our Stone man, contacted in September 2007, is Simon Bramley from Hampshire and Middlesex.

Other folks with a Barnsley focus are Amy, Beverly, Dawn, Roy, who also cites Halifax, and Steven. Further Yorkshire contributors profess bonds with Doncaster, Susan; Leeds, Shan and Thomas; Tadcaster, James and Keith; Selby and Sculcoates, Joan; Knaresboro, Katie; Sheffield, Oliver; York, Lindsey and Michael.

Shropshire pasts are grazed by Nia, tentatively counted as a Cound. Sharron relates to Atcham and in a big way to Shrewsbury, which is all hers apart from a longstanding claim by Alice. Wellington is of interest to Beverly and Lorna. Grenville is alone in Ludlow, Jean has a stake in Hanwood, and Linda from Tripoli goes back to Donnington. Westbury is Paul’s monopoly at the moment.

In Lancashire Rochdale is noted by Alec and Darren; Bury by Alice and Melvyn; Royton by Heather. Liverpool and West Derby are in Stephanie’s jurisdiction.

The borders in England are fluid and bedazzling, but this fourth-generation ex-pat will put Stockport in Cheshire, and let David, Irene and Peter decide if the outsider has stepped over the line. Alsager is the domain of Judith Ann, Lynda and Terence, notwithstanding anyone who might live there now. Karen mentions Hardingwood, while Stacey lays roots in Odd Rode bare.

Greater Manchester means something to David, while Bardsley is sung by Dainel and William, a chip and an older bloke, and Birkenhead belongs to John. 

Staffordshire, and pardon me for starting with Burslem, where Deborah is of kindred mind, also boasts entries for Hanley by Jennifer, Paul and Peter; Stoke by Annie, Douglas Jemma, Lisa and Penny; Kidsgrove by John and Susan; Tunstall by Judith Ann; Newcastle by Marie and Neil. Inching out of the Potteries, we find Brian with designs on Cannock, Chris citing Cheadle and Stephen and David Penkhull. Hilderstone is known to Hazel, Leigh to Jean, and Wolverhampton to Samantha.

The West Midlands have several honorable mentions. Philip cites Birmingham and Mark Sutton Coldfield, but the emphasis is on Dudley, populated thickly by Brett, Keeley, Mel and Michelle.

Farther south off of our beaten path Gary testifies to birth in gay Brighton and Dawn puts Colchester on our map. Nicholas locates a cradle in Hendon, while Sarah knows of nappies in Slough.

A few of the places named are a bit obscure. Andrew and Jennifer mention “Sutto.” Is that Sutton Coldfield? Stoke on Trent? Or the scene of one of the myths with a penchant for our calling.


Established 2001. Last updated October 30, 2014. Number of visits below.